News

  • On March 1st, 2012, Dr. Vo-Dinh gave a distinguished lecture titled "Plasmonic Nanosensors and Nanoprobes: Monitoring Health from the Gene Level, Single Cell Systems to Medical Diagnostics" at Material Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University.

    Read more

  • Before we experience symptoms of infections or disease, our bodies are hard at work, fighting viruses, bacteria or other illnesses. This lag time, between when our immune systems recognize sickness and when we actually begin to feel sick, represents an early window for detecting disease – and researchers are looking into it.

    Scientists from Duke’s Pratt School of Engineering, in collaboration with medical researchers at the Duke Institute of Genome Science & Policy, are developing new diagnostic tests that may help detect patients’ illnesses early on.

    Read more

  • On Tuesday, October 16th, 2012, Dr. Vo-Dinh presented a plenary lecture at the 22nd International Conference on Optical Fiber Sensors (OFS-22) which was held in Beijing from 15-19 October 2012. Title of the talk was "Optical Nanosensors and Nanoprobes: From Single-Cell Exploration to Medical Diagnostics".

    Read more

  • NanoSight, leading manufacturers of unique nanoparticle characterization technology, reports on the work of Professor Tuan Vo-Dinh's group at Duke University where they apply Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA) to characterize metal nanoparticle construct materials for use in biosensing, imaging and cancer therapy.

    Read More

  • Dr. Vo-Dinh presented a plenary lecture entitled “Nanosensors and Nanoprobes: Monitoring Health at the Gene and Single Cell Level” at the 5th IEEE international Conference on Nano/Molecular Medicine and Engineering (IEEE-NANOMED 2011), Jeju Island, South Korea, December 9-12, 2011.

  • Dr. Vo-Dinh received the 2011 Award on Spectrochemical Analysis from the American Chemical Society (ACS), Analytical Chemistry Division. The award is given to individual for advancing the fields of spectrochemical analysis and optical spectrometry in one or more of the following:

    - Conceptualization and development of unique instrumentation that has made a significant impact on the field.

    - Development of novel and important instrumentation.

    - Elucidation of fundamental events or processes important to the field.

    - Authorship of important research papers and/or books that have had an influential role in the development of the field and in the use of chemical instrumentation.

    Read more

  • The United States still leads the world in the number and importance of patentable inventions; last year alone, close to 500,000 patent applications were filed in this country. (Of course, many U.S. patent applications are filed by inventors living abroad.) In our current newsletter, the Vilcek Foundation illustrates a less well-known aspect of inventorship – the contribution of immigrants to inventions created in the US. As an immigrant and a patent holder myself, this is a topic very close to my heart.

    Read More

  • Scientists at Duke University have developed a new noninvasive optical technique that uses a laser to peer into the genetic material of cells, enabling the detection of early-stage cancer and other diseases.

    Read More

  • Tiny gold stars, smaller than a billionth of a meter, may hold the promise for new approaches to medical diagnoses or testing for environmental contaminants.

    Read More

  • Rods, cones, cubes and spheres -- move aside. Tiny gold stars, smaller than a billionth of a meter, may hold the promise for new approaches to medical diagnoses or testing for environmental contaminants.

    Read more

Pages