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  • Dr. Tuan Vo-Dinh received the 2022 SPIE President’s Award

     Dr. Vo-Dinh received the 2022 SPIE President’s Award, from SPIE, the International Society for Optics and Photonics. The SPIE President’s Award is presented to an individual who, in the opinion of the President and the Board of Directors, has rendered a unique and meritorious service of outstanding benefit to the Society.

    https://spie.org/news/tuan-vo-dinh-the-2022-spie-presidents-award

    SPIE is the International Society for Optics and Photonics serving more than 255,000 constituents from 183 countries:

    https://spie.org/about-spie

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    SIR GEORGE STOKES AWARD

    The biennial Sir George Stokes Award is given to a leading analytical scientist awarded for translating research in biomolecular engineering and nanotechnology into new analytical devices and reagents to improve human and animal health.

     

    The RSC Sir George Stokes Award Symposium Honoring Tuan Vo-Dinh was organized at the SciX Conference on September 30,2021

     

    Dr. Tuan Vo-Dinh received the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) Sir George Stokes Award and presented a plenary lecture on September 30 at the 2021 Annual SciX Conference, the premier meeting for analytical chemistry and allied sciences. The award was for his outstanding and sustained contributions to analytical science through innovations in photonics, spectroscopy, molecular biology and nanotechnology.

    https://www.scixconference.org/RSC-Sir-George-Stokes-Award/

     

    21AWD01 - RSC Sir George Stokes Award Symposium Honoring Tuan Vo-Dinh

     

    September 30, 2021, 1:30 PM – 3:10 PM Eastern Daylight Time

     

    Chair:  Tuan Vo-Dinh, PhD – Duke University

    On-site Chair:  Laura Fabris, PhD – Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey

     

    ·  AWD-01.2 - Applications of SERS in Biology and Medicine: from the Bench to the Clinic

    Invited Speaker:Laura Fabris, PhD – Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey

     

    ·  AWD-01.3 - New Methods and Paradigms in Optical Sensing
    Invited Speaker:Brian Cullum, PhD – University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC)

    VIEW AND LISTEN: link

     

    ·  AWD-01.4 - Physical Ultrasonics – From Microspheres to Manipulation
    Invited Speaker:Joel Mobley, PhD – The University of Mississippi

    VIEW AND LISTEN: link

     

    ·  AWD-01.5 - Bioengineering for COVID-19: Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics (RADx) at Unprecedented Speed and Scale 
    Invited Speaker:Bruce J. Tromberg, PhD – National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering/NIH

    VIEW AND LISTEN: link

  • SPIE Fellow Tuan Vo-Dinh is R. Eugene and Susie E. Goodson Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering, professor of chemistry, and director of The Fitzpatrick Institute for Photonics at Duke University (USA). His research has focused on the development of advanced technologies for the protection of the environment and the improvement of human health. His research activities involve nano-biophotonics, nanosensors, laser spectroscopy, molecular imaging, medical diagnostics, cancer detection, chemical sensors, biosensors, and biochips.

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  • Biomedical engineers at Duke University have engineered a method for simultaneously detecting the presence of multiple specific microRNAs in RNA extracted from tissue samples without the need for labeling or target amplification.

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  • Working at the frontiers of biotechnology, fiberoptics, lasers technique and molecular spectroscopy, Tuan Vo-Dinh of Duke University has developed multiple sensor technologies useful for medical research and diagnostics. 

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  • Tuan Vo-Dinh, the R. Eugene and Susie E. Goodson Professor of Biomedical Engineering, professor of chemistry, and director of The Fitzpatrick Institute for Photonics at Duke University, has been awarded the 2019 Sir George Stokes Award by the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC). Vo-Dinh was recognized for his "outstanding and sustained contributions to analytical science through innovations in the field of photonics, spectroscopy, molecular biology and nanotechnology." 

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  • Duke photonics expert Tuan Vo-Dinh, director of the Fitzpatrick Institute for Photonics, R. Eugene and Susie E. Goodson professor of biomedical engineering and professor of chemistry, will be among a distinguished roster of speakers in Paris on May 16, inaugurating the first “International Day of Light” at the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) headquarters.

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  • By combining an FDA-approved cancer immunotherapy with an emerging tumor-roasting nanotechnology, Dr. Vo-Dinh and group improved the efficacy of both therapies in a proof-of-concept study using mice.

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    A group of gold nanostars under an electron microscope. The nanostars' size causes them to accumulate within tumors, where researchers use infrared light to heat them and destroy cancerous growths.

  • Dr. Vo-Dinh presented a plenary lecture at the IPA 2015 / SPIE Biophotonics South America Conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil May 22 - May 26, 2015. 

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  • Nanophotonics is now a major research theme in optical physics and engineering. Driven by the dream of untapped device functionality, nanophotonics studies the exciting science of the interaction of light with nanostructures, at the size scale where optical, electronic, structural, thermal and mechanical properties are deeply interdependent.

    Some experts believe that nanophotonics will continue to boom for the next decade on the ticket of a green enabling technology, and that with an outlook of 10 years plus, we will see “nanophotonics inside” solutions for telecoms, sensor and data-processing applications.

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